‘We cry and cry’: pain endures for mothers of missing Chibok schoolgirls

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Yana Galang, left, with film-maker Joel Kashi Benson, whose documentary Daughters of Chibok focuses on the enduring suffering of the mothers whose children were kidnapped by Boko Haram in April 2014

Five years after she last saw her daughter, Yana Galang fears the world has forgotten a tragedy that splintered families and is now the subject of an award-winning documentary.Last week, Yana Galang left her small farm in Borno state, Nigeria, in the care of seven of her eight children and travelled by bus and train for the first time to the capital, Lagos. From there, she became the first member of her family ever to board a plane, and came to New York.

The mother of one of the 112 Nigerian schoolgirls of Chibok still missing after being abducted by Boko Haram in 2014 came to the city during the UN general assembly, on a mission to remind the world that – five years on – their children still have not been brought home.Galang feels the world had forgotten about the kidnapped girls.“If this was the president’s or vice-president’s daughter, they would have found her by now,” Galang told the Guardian. “But in three years they don’t call us. We’ve heard nothing. We cry and cry and the tears dry, and still we have no answer.”

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